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George Bancroft SSBN-643 - History

George Bancroft SSBN-643 - History



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George Bancroft

(SSB(N) 643: dp. 7,320 (surf.), 8,250 (subm.), 1. 425'
b. 33'; s. over 20 k., cpl. 140, a. 16 A 3 Poll mis; cl.
Lafayette)

George Bancroft (SSB(N)643) was laid down by the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corp. Groton, Conn., 24 August 1963, launched 20 March 1965, sponsored by Mrs. Jean B. Langdon, great, great granddaughter of Secretary Bancroft, and Mrs. Anita C. Irvine, great, great, great granddaughter; and commissioned 22 January 1966, Captain Joseph Williams (blue crew) and Comdr. Walter M. Douglas (gold crew) in command.

The new Polaris submarine was assigned to Submarine Squadron 14 of Submarine Flotilla 6 with New London as home port. Her first deployment began 26 July 1966. Soon after the patrol was successfully completed at Holy Loch, Scotland, the gold crew relieved the blue. A few weeks later, George Bancroft got underway for her second patrol which ended toward the close of the year Early in 1967, George Bancroft began her third patrol. She silently and invisibly roves the seas as a mighty deterrent against aggression, preserving the peace and protecting freedom.


USS George Bancroft SSBN-643 – A Cold War Warrior

Not often do you get to see a submarine surfacing through the earth.

A true Cold War warrior. America deployed the first boomers, the Forty-one for Freedom, to deter the Soviet Union from launching a first strike nuclear attack on the United States.

Love them or loathe them, they prevented a nuclear war with the Soviets and that was their mission.

The new (1980s) Trident class nuclear ballistic submarines (SSBNs) are the latest way to deter an enemy from launching a first strike. They are essentially invisible to our enemies while on patrol – hence the strategic deterrent. Even if all of our land based nuclear capabilities were destroyed in an insane first strike, the Trident fleet would essentially deliver a final blow to our attackers and lessen the chances for a follow on attack. Crazy stuff to think about but it is the reality of the world. Until all nuclear weapons are eliminated, it is the future that we have to live with.

Praying for an eventual end to all nuclear weapons and actually working towards that end are two different things. Someone must step forward to start the process.

Give peace a chance… but in the meantime ensure that peace has a chance by a strong commitment to deterrence.


George Bancroft SSBN-643 - History

BANCROFT'S DECEASED SHIPMATES

* = ADDED AT OR SINCE OUR LAST REUNION LAST UPDATE: 6/5//21

JAMES P ADAMS GOLD LCDR (ENGINEER) 82=85 PASSED IN JAN-2016

KEVIN M ALLEN GOLD IC 1964-67 COMM. CREW

WILLIAM AMENT GOLD MMC(SS) 1972-77

CHRIS ANDERSON BLUE NUKE ELECTR. 1979-? PASSED AWAY 2010

ROBERT ARCHER GOLD LT, WEAPONS DEPT 1985-86 PASSED AWAY 6/2009

STEPHEN J ASHER MID 60'S PASSED AWAY MARCH, 2014

WILLIAM AUSTIN GOLD RMCM 1976-79

DEAN BARNES GOLD YEOMAN COMM. CREW

ROBERT W BARNES BLUE MC(SS), LCDR 1981-85 ENGINEERING

ERNESTO BARACEROS GOLD WARDROOM STEWARD 1968-72 PASSED AWAY JULY 9, 2020

DEAN BARNEY GOLD CH. OF THE BOAT 1972-73

TERRY BARNICKLE BLUE NAVET LATE EIGHTIES PASSED AWAY 2008

JOHN BART BLUE REACTOR OPER.

CALVIN B BARTLETT GOLD NAVET COMM CREW PASSED AWAY 11-15-1994

DARRYL BATES GOLD WEAPS OFFICER PASSED AWAY 6/14/2010

KENNETH BATLA BLUE LATE 60'S PASSED AWAY APRIL 1990

MIKE BEAN BLUE MM1 1990-92 DECOM CREW

COLE BECKHAM BLUE & GOLD NAVIGATION DEPT 1966-67 PASSE AWAY 3/7/2013

KEN BENTON GOLD (COMM. CREW) FTB1 1965-67 PASSED AWAY FEB 2011

BOB BERENDT MS3/SS 1977-79 PASSED AWAY AUG. 2011

RICHARD L BEST BLUE RC DIV 1974-77 P A APRIL 2011

STANLEY BICE GOLD A GANG, MM1 1976-83 P.A. 7/21/12

WILLIAM S. BOBROWSKI PASSED AWAY 10/18/19

JACKIE LEE BOGER BLUE TM2(SS) 1982-85 PASSED AWAY FEB 2, 1987

PETER A BOYLE BLUE MM ( A- GANG) 1974=76 PASSED AWAY 2/7/19

GARY F BROWN BLUE MTCM/FTCS(SS) 1981-85 PASSED 2/22/2017

JAMES BOWEN GOLD QMC (SS) GOLD 76-79 P A OCT. 2011

DON BRIGGS BLUE/GOLD X.O. 1966-69

SHAWN BURDEN GOLD DECK DIV 1985-86

GARY BURRELL BLUE RMC(SS) 1977-83 PASSED AWAY 12/29/16

DON BURRIS SONARMAN 1969-73

RICHARD BUSQUE BLUE DECK DIVISION 1967-68

LEON BUTLER GOLD FOOD SERVICE COMM. CREW

JOHN "PETE" CADY GOLD COMMANDING OFFICER 1966-68 PASSED AWAY 3/11

ARLINGTON F CAMPBELL GOLD LT. ENGINEERING 1967-69 PASSED AWAY 27 JAN, 2009

JEROME CAPLAN BLUE NUC ET 1964-68 PASSED AWAY 3/30/2018

ORMEL CARR CH. OF THE BOAT 1965-66 COMM. CREW

WILLIAM H CARSON GOLD C.O. 1981-82 PASSED AWAY 11/9/17

MANNY CHAVEZ BLUE MSCM C.O.B. 1980-82 PASSED AWAY 10/23/18

TOMMY D. CHERRY GOLD STS1 1982-86 PASSED AWAY MARCH 2018

LONNIE COATS BLUE& GOLD CHIEF RADIOMAN 1969-74 BLUE & GOLD

JIM CONDON BLUE/GOLD ET1, RC DIV 1967-73 PASSED AWAY 2/25/2016

HUBERT "COUNTRY" COLEMAN GOLD,COMM QUARTERMASTER 1965-? PASSED AWAY NOV. 1984

WILLIAM B COOK BLUE EMCS/SS 1982-86 PASSED AWAY 2/2009

BILL COUGHLIN ? PASSED AWAY 1/26/2016

JOHN CROUSE SUPPORTED BOTH NUKE MMC(SS) ST, MARYS MUSEUM MNGR

AL CROWD GOLD ET 1970-74

DAN CURRAN GOLD WEAPONS OFFICER 1968-69 PASSED IN MAY '10

FLOYD CZAJA BLUE NAVET, ET2 1981-85 PASSED AWAY OCTOBER 2016

ROBERT DARRIGO GOLD ELECTRICIAN'S MATE 1985-86

HORACE DAVIS BLUE COMMISARY 1967-74 P A 2/2008

CRAIG DAVIS BLUE MT 3 MID 70'S PASSED IN 3/2011

JOE DAVIS BLUE MM IN M DIV

THERON L.DAVIS GOLD LCMDR, ENGINEERING 1972-75 PASSED AWAY 6/6/14

WENDAL DAVIS BLUE FTCS 1977-79 PASSED IN 1996

BRIAN DEAN GOLD TM3 SS SEPT. 1993 PASSED AWAY 6 DECEMBER 2018

RICK DELAY GOLD SONAR TECH 1982-85

JIM DEMOREST BLUE SONARMAN 1066-69 PASSED AWAY 10/9/2017

ROBERT DESCHAINE BLUE TMCM(SS) EARLY 70's PASSED AWAY 2015

LIONEL DESPRES BLUE CHIEF FTB 1965-? COMM. CREW

WESLEY DIETZ GOLD FTBC=SS 1965-69 PASSED AWAY 6/23/2019

WALTER M DOUGLAS GOLD & BLUE COMMANDING OFFICER 1966-68 COMM. CREW

J B EDMUNDS GOLD FOOD SERVICE COMM. CREW

GLENN EDRINGTON BLUE FCCS (SS) 1982-84 P.A. 9-26-12

SKIP ELTRINGHAM BLUE FTB1(SS) 1969-73 PASSED AWAY JAN. 2014

MIKE R. EVANS MID 70'S PASSED AWAY 7/16/2008

EDDIE EVERETT GOLD CHIEF TORPEDOMAN 1965-? COMM. CREW

CHUCK EWING GOLD SONAR COMM CREW 1965-68 PASSED AWAY 6/2011

FRANK FAIRCHILD BLUE MMC/SS 1977-79 PASSED AWAY 24 AUGUST 2019

EDWARD FAXLANGER GOLD 1987-90 PASSED AWAY 12/29/2015

AL FERRIS BLUE CHIEF RADIOMAN COMM. CREW

MIKE FLAMMIA BLUE COMM CREW COOK 1964-68 PASSED AWAY 5/15/19

PATRICK FOSTER BLUE ETC(SS) 1965-66 COMM. CREW

THOMAS R FOX GOLD NAV OFFICER EARLY 70'S PASSED AWAY MAY 23. 2020

EDWARD "MICK" FRARY GOLD CHIEF MISSLE TECH 1965-67 COMM. CREW

JIM FRENCH GOLD MMCM 1970'S

JOHN A FREW BLUE PLANKOWNER IC/RC DIV OFFICER 1965-67 P. A. 6-16-12

ROGER FRY BOTH ETN2)SS) 1972-74

JAMES FRYSINGER GOLD LT. CMDR NAVOPS 1980-83 PASSED AWAY 4/17/2020

DANIEL H. FURLAN GOLD ETCS/SS 1985-90 P.A. NOV. 2011

CRAIG GALLOWAY GOLD A - GANG 1973-76 P.A. FEB. 2008

BILLY W GARRISON BLUE ELECTRICIAN 1968-69 PASSED AWAY 10/11/18

JIM GAUTHIER GOLD TMC(SS) 74-79 P[ASASED AWAY 4/13/2018

BRUCE GEHRING BLUE ELECTRICIAN 1968-70

JOE "TACO JOE" GEMMA BLUE STC 1973-79

ROBERT RAY GLASSCOCK ENGINEERING P.A. SEPT. 2010

DON GODFREY GOLD ETC EARLY 70'S PASSED AWAY JAN 2018

ED GRANT BLUE WEAPONS OFFICER COMM. CREW

DAN GREELEY BLUE NUC EM1 SS EARLY 70'S PASSEDWAY 12/16/2020

FLYNOID GREGORY BLUE MMCS- LPO 1972- 76 PASSED AWAY AUG 6, 2017

BOB GRIMM BLUE (COB) FTCM 1989-91

HUGH GUSTAFSON BLUE A- GANG 1974-77 PASSED AWAY FEB 17, 2020

TONY GUTIERREZ BLUE IC1(SS) 1978-82 PASSED AUG 1999

EDWARD HAHN GOLD FN (SS) 1965-67 PASSED AWAY 2006

RON HALSCHIED GOLD TM2 (SS) 72-74 PASSED AWAY AUG 2015

MIKE HAMBY BLUE MM2 A-GANG 1976-82 PASSED AWAY 11/2014

LARRY HANSBERRY GOLD FTBC 1972-75 PASSED ON JULY 5, 2013

GEORGE HANSEN GOLD IC1 COMM CREW

DAMON HARE BLUE MS2 1978- 1979 PASSED AWAY AUGUST 2014

GERALD HARRINGTON BLUE FTG1 1977-80 PASSED AWAY NOV 7, 2011

CALVIN HARRIS GOLD EN2(SS) 1965-68 PASSED AWAY 11-14-14

JOHN R HAZEN GOLD STS3(SS) 1978 P.A. 7/20/2011

CHARLES J HAUGHNEY GOLD LT. 1968-70 PASSED AWAY JULY 12, 2015

THOMAS HERMAN BLUE MM1(SS) 72-81 PASSED AWAY MARCH 18, 2021

DOC HEMMINGER GOLD TM3 SS 1966-69 PASSED AWAY JUNE 3 2018

REX HURKERT BLUE MT3 1981

JOHN F HEWITT BLUE LCDR 1970-74 NAVOPS

RUSTY HINES BLUE SK2 (SS) 1983-85 PASSWED AWAY 5/9/18

GENE HOFFMAN STS3(SS) PASSED AWAY 5/1/2016

MANFRED HOLIK BLUE FTB1(SS) 1966+

FRED HOLLENDONNER BLUE ET1(SS) 1965-68 COMM CREW

DEAN HORN BLUE CH. TORPEDOMAN COMM. CREW

ROYCE HORNBACK GOLD MASTER CHIEF COOK 76-77 PASSED AWAY 1996

LARRY HOUSE RADIOMAN 1972 PA JUNE 1995

ELDON IVY BLUE MMCM 1969-71 PASSED AWAY NOV 19, 2016

DOUGLAS JAHR BLUE ET2 1990-93

DENNIS JANUESHESKE GOLD IC DIV 1981-85 P A 5/31/12

DAVID S JERDEMAN GOLD FTG2 COMM. CREW

RICHARD F JONES GOLD FTB2 1969-74 PASSED AWAY 2006

JOHN F JORDAN BLUE XO 1975-78 PASSED AWAY JAN 28, 2021

RICHARD KAHLER BLUE MACHINIST MATE 1966-69 PASSED AWAY 12/25/2014

WILLIAM L KATHER BLUE CORPSMAN COMM. CREW

JOHN J KENNEDY BLUE/GOLD ET1(SS) 1970's NAVET

JAMES KILLIMGWORTH BLUE STS1(SS) 79-83 PASSED AWAY OCT 2020

LEON KING GOLD XO CMDR LATE 70'S PASSED AWAY JUNE 4, 2019

BRUCE KOHOUT GOLD SONARMAN 1968-70 PASSED AWAY 1974

WALTER LABONTE BLUE TM2 1969-74 PASSED AWAY 2/23/15

JAMES LANDRY GOLD QMC C.O.B. COMM CREW

JAMES LANTRIP* BLUE EM 82-86 PASSED AWAY 6/5/21

JOHN H. LANGLE GOLD CSC COMM CREW PASSED AWAY 1-22-21

PETER LASSONDE GOLD ET1, NAVET 1974-78 PASSED 10 AUG 08

JIM LATHAM BLUE CMDR, ENGINEER 1975-78 PASSED AWAY 3/15/16

TERRY LAWVER GOLD MM3 SS 1972-75 PASSED AWAY 11/12/17

THADEOUS LAWHORNE GOLD FTGC(SS) COB LATE 60'S-MID 70'S PASSED AWAY 1-22-19

HERMAN LAVAUR GOLD MM1 A-GANG COMM.CREW

LYLE LEADER GOLD MT3 COMM CREW PASSED ON 9-14-17

SANFORD LEVEY BLUE COMMANDING OFFICER 1968-70 PASSED AWAY APR, 2011

TERRY W. LENTS BLUE 1975-78 PASSED ON 11/08/2012

DENNIS LEMCKE BLUE FTG1(SS) PASSED ON MAY 11, 1986

CHRIS LEWIS GOLD SK3 1967-70 PASSED AWAY AUG 2012

GENE LIVINGSTON BLUE LT. DCA COMM. CREW PASSED AWAY 7/23/16

ROBERT LOEWANTHAL GOLD COMMANDING OFFICER 1972-75

STEVE LUCAS GOLD TMC 1972-75 PASSED AWAY 2008

MEL LYMAN BLUE LCMDR- AWEPS 1969-73 PASSED AWAY JULY 2020

TED MANKER JR BLUE CHIEF OF THE BOAT 1967-70

MARK P MACNULTY GOLD RADIOMAN 1981-85 PASSED AWAY 3/11

KEITH L MARCHBANKS GOLD SUPPLY ORFFICER 1984-85 PASSED AWAY OCTOBER 24, 2014

CREIGHTON MARSHALL BLUE TM-LAUNCHER 1971-73 PASSED AWAY 12/30/ OFF2016

DAN MATSON GOLD SONAR TECH 1965-70 PASSED AWAY 10/15/2014

ALEXANDER MCGREGOR GOLD E DIV OFFICER 1969-. PASSED AWAY JULY 5, 2020

JAMES W. McKINSTER GOLD COMMANDING OFFICER 1968-71 PASSED AWAY JULY 2012

WILLIAM McPHERSON BLUE ELECTRICIAN 1969-71 PASSED AWAY 9-21-2015

PATRICK McMAHON BLUE MT2(ss) 85-88 PASSED AWAY 6/30/2009

TERRY McNINCH BLUE REACTOR OPERATOR 1973-75

JOE McCLEARY BLUE MT2(SS) 1964-69 PASSED AWAY 8/15/2015

DURWOOD MERRITT BLUE FTBC (SS) 1971-75 PASSWED AWAY 2/16/1976

GEORGE A METH GOLD ET2 NAV ET 1971-75 PASSED AWAY 3/2/2014

RAY MILITE GOLD RMC(SS) 1975-79 PASSED AWAY 8/10

DALE MITTELSTEADT BLUE STSCS(SS) 1979-84 PASSED AWAY NOV 1992

GEORGE "JACK" MLADSI GOLD NAVOPS MID 60's

JOHN MOODY GOLD ENGINEERING 1977-80 PASSED AWAY OCTOBER 2015

JOE MOORE GOLD LATE 60'S PASSED AWAY 2011

STAN MOORE BLUE NAV ET 1981-?? PASSED AWAY 11-25-18

BOB MONTORE BLUE EMI (SS) E DIV 1966-69 PASSED AWAY 6/24/14

FRANCISCO MORENO JR BLUE LT. ("RCA" ) 1988-91 PASSED AWAY 9/16/12

JOHN MORTSAKIS GOLD LT. ENG. DEPT, DCA 1969-73 PASSED AWAY AUG 9, 2019

DAVID MORTRUD BLUE SUPPLY OFFICER 1966-67

JOE MUELLER GOLD MPA, LT. PLANKOWNER PASSED AWAY 12/31/18

RON MULHERON JR GOLD ET COMM. CREW

BOB NAPIER BLUE STOREKEEPER 1965-67 COMM. CREW

MICHAEL J NAUGHTON BLUE LCMDR-NAVIGATOR LATE 80'S PASSED AWAY JAN 11, 2021

GARY NEVILS BLUE SEAMAN GANG 1973-74

JIM NICHOLSON BLUE MM1 Nuke 1973-76 PASSED ON 5/14/2017

JEAN NIDEVER GOLD QM3 1966-69 NAVOPS

RAY NIXON PASSED AWAY 1-18-15

JOEL NOBLE BLUE MEDICAL OFF. Comm Crew

BRIAN OBRIEN GOLD M DIVISION 72-75 PASSED AWAY 2/21/19

A.P.OLZEWSKI GOLD FTBC 1965-68 COMM.CREW

ROBERT OMALIA BLUE COMMANDING OFFICER 1970-74

DON O'NEIL BLUE QUARTERMASTER PASSED AWAY 2/2004

RONALD W OWEN PASSED AWAY 6/2003

JAMES (JESSE) OWENS GOLD SKC(SS) COMM CREW 1965-68 PASSED ON 11/21/2010

HERB "BUBBA" OSBURN BLUE MM2(SS) NUC ET 1986-88 PASSED AWAY 2/14/15

GERALD E. PALMER BLUE MM2 SS 70'S PASSED AWAY 8/31/14

RAY C PARKS BLUE RADIOMAN 69-70'S PASSED AWAY 6/22/17

DOUG PARTON GOLD ET1 1975-78

KEMP PENDARVIS BLUE MISSILE TECH MID 80'S PASSED AWAY 1/12/2020

DENTON PEOPLES GOLD (COMMISIONING) LT RC DIV OFF. 1965-67 PASSED AWAY 5/24/16

LEE PHILLIPS BLUE RADIOMAN 1979-81 PASSED AWAY IN 2004

TOM (SNAKE) PHYTHIAN GOLD NUC MM 1967-70 P.A JAN. 2011

JOHN PODREBARAC BLUE MM1/SS COMM CREW 1964-67 PASSED AWAY MARCH 2015

RUSTY PRICE GOLD MT1 1974-77 PASSED AWAY 12/20/2018

JOHN (JJ) QUINN GOLD C ORPSMAN 1975-76

RON RAPHEAL GOLD 1968-69

BARTON RICE III BLUE RM2/SS 1988-92 PASSED AWAY SEPT 2011

BRUCE RICE BLUE MEDICAL OFFICER COMM. CREW

JAMES P RILEY BLUE TM1/SS 1967-72 PASS DATE UNKNOWN

KEN RIGBY BLUE MM1(SS) 1977-80

ARNALDO "ARNIE" RIVERA BLUE SKI SS 1989- DECOM PASSED AWAY 27 APRIL 2020

ROBERT B ROBERTSON BLUE TMC(SS) 1971-72 PASSED AWAY IN 1972

JOSEPH ROBINSON BLUE MM1 EARLY 80'S PASSED AWAY 10/7/97

RON RYLAND BLUE ICC(SS) COMM. CREW PASSED AWAY 9/24/2015

JOE S. RYCHETSKY GOLD ELT PRIOR TO 1976 PASSED AWAY OCTOBER 2003

BOB SADLER BLUE COOK COMM CREW 1965-? PA MAY 2009

GARY H SATTERLEE TMC(SS) 10/89-1/91 PA APRIL 2012

RICHARD L SCHAUT SR GOLD MM1 (SS) ELT 1964-70 P.A. 12/27/2015

RODNEY SEARS GOLD MMC COMM. CREW

FRANK SHAUGNESSY BLUE NAVIGATOR 1965-? COMM.CREW

MELTON SHEPPO GOLD ETC(SS) COB 1969-72 P.A. ON 1/9/2011

CHUCK SHOGREN BLUE MMCS A GANG 1977-82 PASSED AWAY 4/15/21

LARRY SICARD GOLD YOEMAN PASSED AWAY APRIL 2012

PAUL SIMONDS GOLD QM1 COMM.CREW

ROYAL "BUD" SPOONER GOLD MMCS 1983-85

JOHN SHELDON BLUE & GOLD STS1 1977-81 PASSED AWAY APRIL 20, 2019

ROBERT G SHELTON GOLD ET PASSED AWAY 10/30/2017

ROBERT SMEARDEN GOLD FTB2 LATE 60'S PASSED AWAY 6/3/2014

RICHARD L SMITH BLUE ETR2 COMM CREW PASSED AWAY IN 1985

CLARENCE E STANSELL BLUE RMC (SS) 80-83 PASSED AWAY 2/19/2019

RICHARD R. STARK GOLD & BLUE COMMANDING OFFICER 86-89 PASSED AWAY 12/5/2019

BRUCE STEEVES BLUE QUARTERMASTER

STAN SUCH GOLD/BLUE MACHINIST MATE 1968-72

ROB SUTTON BLUE RADIOMAN MID 70'S PASSED AWAY SEPT. 2013

DON SWEAT BLUE COMM CREW TMC (SS) 1965-? P.A. EARLY 90'S

BOB TAVARES BLUE COMM CREW STSCS(SS) 1965-68 P.A. NOV 2009

WILLY TEER GOLD MACHINIST MATE EARLY 70'S PASSED EARLY 1975

THOMAS TERRY GOLD MM1 COMM. CREW PASSED AWAY FEB 1998

FRED THARIN BLUE MACHINIST MATE COMM. CREW

SCOTT THORELL GOLD ASST. WEAPONS OFFICER COMM. CREW

LARRY THOMAS BLUE MTC(SS) 1976-80 PASSED AWAY JULY 2011

LARRY TIETZE BLUE SK4 1968-69 PASSED AWAY OCTOBER 2016

WILLIAM TIER GOLD MACHINIST MATE 1972-75

RICKY TIBBS PASSED ON 7/17/12

ROBERT TOMPKINS B LUE-COMM NUKE ENGINEMAN 1965-? PA APRIL 2011

JOHN TRUMAN BLUE-COMM MISSILE TECH PA 3/23/2018

DAVID K TUCKER BLUE MT2 1979-83 PASSED 2/21/97

DONALD VANCIL GOLD E DIVISION 1978-80 PASSED AWAY 12/14/2019

CHARLES (CHESTER) VICKERS GOLD CHIEF AUXILIARYMAN 1969-73

PAUL A. VIERING BLUE ETC SS 1982-85 PASSED ON JULY 17, 2018

CHARLIE VINCENT BLUE NUKE E9 71-75 PASSED AWAY 11-15-18

RON WALKER GOLD M DIVISION 1975-78 PASSED ON 3/24/13

DON WASHBURN GOLD TM1 1968-71 PASSED ON 9/19/2018

EDDIE WATSON BLUE FOOD SERVICE 1968-70

FRANK WEBB GOLD EM1(SS), E DIV 1967-69 PASSED APRIL 2006

JOE WILLIAMS JR . Vice Admiral BLUE C. O. (PreComm & Blue) 1964-67 PASSED MAY 15, 2015

RON E WILLIAMS SKCS 1983-86

ROY WILKES GOLD MM2(SS) A GANG 1968-73 PASSED AWAY 12/24/16

JAMES R WILSON GOLD C.O. CMDR 1975-78 PASSEWD AWAY 4/2/2020

BERNARD WIRTH (BERNIE) GOLD YN1(SS) 1967-69 PASSED AWAY 8/10/2015


George Bancroft SSBN-643 - History

USS George Bancroft, SSBN-643 Sail Exhibit After more than six months of construction and tireless efforts to raise money for its completion, the USS George Bancroft (SSBN 643) Sail Exhibit was dedicated April 7, 2000. The dedication came as the Navy's submarine force marked its 100th anniversary April 11.

The project began Sept. 29, 1999, with a groundbreaking ceremony dedicating an area to display the exhibit outside the Franklin gate. The St. Marys Submarine Museum and the local Subvets Kings Bay Trident Inc/WWII were charged with raising funds for the project.


(photo courtesy of Kevin H Windham, MTCS)

The sail, which is 42 feet wide by 9 feet high and weighs 65 tons, is now part of an exhibition that is 180 feet long, simulating a submarine surfacing. Still to come, the site will have a touch-computer display telling the "Forty-one for Freedom" story. The touch-computer display will include the names of all Bancroft former crew members and the names of every contributor who donated to the project.

Since 1900, more than 600 submarines have served in the United States Navy. Out of them, 59 were designated ballistic missile submarines, including today's 18 Ohio class submarines and the first SSBNs known as the "Forty-one for Freedom." USS Bancroft was one of the original "Forty-one for Freedom" boats that served during the Cold War era.

The St. Marys Submarine Museum will continue to accept donations for the exhibit's upkeep and other general expenses. For more information about or to donate to the George Bancroft Sail Exhibit, contact the St. Marys Submarine Museum at 882-ASUB(2782) or mail donations to George Bancroft Sail Exhibit, c/o St. Marys Submarine Museum, 102 St. Marys Street West, St. Marys, Ga. 31558.


USS George C. Marshall SSBN 654 – Patience not weakness

He would not live to see the submarine that would later bear his name. But the work that he did for the nation ensured that freedom and liberty for many people would be assured. From his day as a cadet at the Virginia Military Institute to his death as a five star General, he never stopped serving a country that he loved. A short article like this cannot capture the whole essence of a life well lived. I have spent the past few days reading biographies of his life including one of the most complete: The Marshall story a biography of General George C. Marshall. … Payne, Robert, 1911-1983. If you can find a copy of this book, it is well worth the read.

Even in death and the way he wished to be memorialized, he was the perfect example of a humble servant.

From The United States Army Official Military History:

General of the Army George C. Marshall Special Military Funeral

16-20 October 1959

General of the Army George C. Marshall died at Walter Reed General Hospital on 16 October 1959 at the age of seventy-eight. By virtue of his former positions as Chief of Staff of the Army and as Secretary of Defense, General Marshall was entitled to a Special Military Funeral and, as a former Secretary of State, he was entitled to the more elaborate honors of an Official Funeral. He received a Special Military Funeral, but in keeping with his known wishes and with what has been described as his “Spartan concept of propriety,” the rites for General Marshall were among the simplest ever conducted for a man of his rank and prestige.

On the day of the general’s death, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued a proclamation ordering the flag flown at half-staff on all public buildings except the Capitol, at all military posts and naval stations in the United States, and at American facilities abroad. The flag was to be so displayed until after the burial service.

… While the ceremony at the cathedral was in progress, some two hundred invited guests filed into the chapel at Fort Myer. Among them were President Eisenhower and former President Harry S. Truman, Secretary of State Christian A. Herter, former Secretary of State Dean G. Acheson, W. Averell Harriman, General of the Army Omar N. Bradley, General Alfred M. Gruenther, and General Matthew B. Ridgway. Members of the Marshall family entered after the President was seated Mrs. Marshall, last to arrive, entered the chapel about 1425.

Outside the Fort Myer Chapel fourteen honorary pallbearers lined the entrance walkway: General Lyman L. Lemnitzer, Robert A. Lovett, General Walter Bedell Smith, Robert Woods Bliss, James Bruce, Admiral Harold R. Stark, General Charles D. Herron, Brig. Gen. Frank McCarthy, Col. Robert H. Fletcher, Col. William M. Spencer, Donald Cook, Lt. Col. Clarence J. George, M. Sgt. James W. Powder, and M. Sgt. William J. Heffner.

At the cemetery

The honorary pallbearers, first to leave their cars, formed a cordon along the mat. The members of the Marshall family got out next and stood while the clergy, body bearers, national color detail, and personal flag bearer took positions at the rear of the hearse. When all were in place, the body bearers removed the casket from the hearse. Then, in procession, the national color detail, mortician, clergy, body bearers with the casket, and personal flag bearer moved through the cordon of honorary pallbearers to the grave. As the casket passed by, the honorary pall­bearers fell in behind and moved to their graveside position. The Marshall family was escorted to the graveside by the cemetery superintendent.

The clergy then conducted the burial service. At its conclusion, the battery fired a 19-gun salute, the firing squad discharged the traditional three volleys, and the bugler sounded taps. As the sound of the bugle died away, the body bearers folded the flag that had draped the casket, and one of them, the cadet from Virginia Military Institute, presented the flag to Mrs. Marshall, thus concluding the simple rites for General Marshall. Mrs. Marshall placed a small bouquet of flowers on her husband’s casket and left the graveside.

This funeral capped a lifetime of service. The story of America is dotted with many names and many heroes sacrifices. But the sum total of the contribution of George C. Marshall places him very close to the top of the list of most significant.

George C. Marshall had been named Time Magazine’s Man of the Year in 1943 and 1947. As Secretary of State from 1947 to 1949, Marshall advocated rebuilding Europe, a program that became known as the Marshall Plan, and which led to his being awarded the 1953 Nobel Peace Prize

Who was George C. Marshall?

George Catlett Marshall, born at Uniontown, Pa., 31 December 1880, was commissioned Second Lieutenant 2 February 1901 upon graduation from the Virginia Military Institute. After serving in the Philippines from 1902 to 1903 and at various posts in the Western United States, he went to the Army Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kans., in 1908. Graduating at the head of his class, he instructed in the school until 1910.

Assignments with the Massachusetts National Guard and the 4th Infantry in Arkansas and Texas preceded his return to the Philippines in 1913. There his brilliance on maneuvers won him prophetic praise from General James Franklin Bell, who called him: “one of those rare men who live and dream in their profession — a soldier who is not satisfied with daily duty superbly done. . . . the greatest military genius of America since Stonewall Jackson.”

When the United States entered World War I, Marshall accompanied the 1st Division to France in July 1917. In the summer of 1918, he was transferred to the A.E.F. Headquarters where he helped to formulate plans for the St. Mihiel offensive and to transfer some 500,000 troops to the Argonne front in 2 weeks without the enemy’s knowledge. In October Marshall became Chief of Operations of the 1st Army during the final action on the Meuse-Argonne sector, which helped greatly to force Germany to capitulate.

Outstanding service in a number of important assignments during the years between the wars won Marshall appointment as Chief of Staff of the Army in September 1939 when Nazi aggression plunged the world into World War II He directed the mobilization of an army of some 10 million men which operated with the Navy and Allied forces in crushing the Axis powers. He was appointed General of the Army 16 December 1944.

After World War II, Marshall served as Secretary of State from 21 January 1945 to 21 January 1949 and was Secretary of Defense from 12 September 1950 to 12 September 1951. He died in Washington 16 October 1959.

About the boat:

In 1958, Congress authorized the construction of the Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine. A total of forty one would be built based on that early plan. These Polaris missile firing submarines were the result of extensive and imaginative development in such fields as environmental control. Nuclear engineering, inertial navigation and solid propellant rocket design.

Namesake: General of the Army George C. Marshall (1880-1959), U.S. Secretary of State (1947-1949) and U.S. Secretary of Defense (1950-1951) This boat would be the lead ship of the last and most highly sophisticated submarine class of Polaris boats.

“She is so named that we may remember a man whose leadership in both war and peace was in keeping with the highest traditions of our nation.”

The boat was ordered on 29 July 1963

Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia

Sponsored by: Mrs. George C. Marshall

Commissioned: 29 April 1966

Decommissioned: 24 September 1992

Motto: Patience, Not Weakness

Class and type: Benjamin Franklin-class fleet ballistic missile submarine

Displacement: 7,300 long tons (7,417 t) surfaced

8,250 long tons (8,382 t) submerged

Installed power: S5W pressurized-water nuclear reactor

Propulsion: 2 × geared steam turbines

1 × shaft 15,000 shp (11,185 kW)

Speed: Over 20 knots (37 km/h 23 mph)

Test depth: 1,300 feet (400 m)

Complement: Two crews (Blue Crew and Gold Crew) of 120 men each

Armament: 16 × ballistic missile tubes with one ballistic missile each

4 × Mark 65 Mod 3 and Mark 65 Mod 421 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes (all forward) with up to 13 Mark 48 torpedoes

Mobile submarine simulator (MOSS) decoy capability 1981-1984

Fate: Scrapping via Ship and Submarine Recycling Program completed 28 February 1994

George C. Marshall (SSB(N)-654) was laid down by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. 2 March 1964 launched 21 May 1965 sponsored by Mrs. George C. Marshall, widow and commissioned 29 April 1966, Comdr. Warran Rich Cobean (blue crew) and Comdr. Willard Edward Johnson (gold crew) in command.

Following shakedown, George C. Marshall prepared for duty as one of the Navy’s nuclear powered Polaris sub marines silently and invisibly roving the seas as a mighty deterrent against aggression, preserving peace and protecting freedom. At her launching former Secretary of State Dean Acheson eloquently described the mighty sub marine’s role in the turbulent cold war: “. . . the waves set up by this launching will go to the furthest reaches of our foreign relations. The very existence of this ship, her power, her mission, her orders, her competence to execute them, will effect more computations, more decisions, than we can readily imagine. Far beyond the Pentagon, the State Department, and the White House she will add a new factor, a new magnitude, to the correlation of forces by which the communists determine their decisions.”

The Official Tag line was Patience not weakness… at one point the crew gave her a fitting submarine update: Patience my ass. Gotta love those submariners.

From the ALL Hands Magazine in September 1967

N0 SHIP IS ever exactly like another ship.

USS George C. Marshall (SSBN 654) is not exactly like her sister ships. She is, nevertheless, representative of the Fleet ballistic missile submarine.

The ship is the 36th F BM and the 58th nuclear powered submarine to become an operating element of the nuclear deterrent force.

Like most Fleet ballistic missile submarines, she is named for a great American. George Catlett Marshall was General of the Army, Secretary of Defense, Secretary of State, and author of the Marshall plan for European recovery. He won the Nobel peace prize in 1953.

As a member of the Lafayette class of FBM submarines, which are the largest ever built, George C. Marshall displaces 8250 tons when submerged and 7250 tons when riding on the surface. This can be compared to the nuclear powered guided missile frigate USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25), which displaces 7600 tons standard.

George C. Marshall is outfitted with the equipment to fire 16 A-3 Polaris missiles.

These missiles, with a maximum range of 2500 miles, are carried in 16 tubes amidships. They may be launched either while the submarine is on the surface or under the sea.

The missiles are ejected from the tubes by means of compressed air, though later models have steam launchers. In the steam launching method, a small solid fuel rocket motor burns and pours its extremely hot gases into a water-filled chamber. This water immediately turns to steam and forces the missile out of its receptacle.

The ship can also launch torpedoes. She is equipped with four 21-inch torpedo tubes on the bow.

Like other subs of her type, George C. Marshall was built to patrol for extended periods of time. Consequently, her designers allowed as many comforts as possible. The crew has access to a small laundry, which includes washers and dryers. There is a three-man gym. A crew’s lounge also does duty as a lecture room and study hall. The galley, which would please any modern housewife is open to the crew—the submariner who prides himself as a chef practically has carte blanche.

A fellow can also get an education down there—via PACE (Program for Afloat College Education), formerly known as Polaris University. It’s possible for the ambitious sub mariner to earn as much as two years of credits toward a degree from Harvard, the University of South Carolina, San Diego State College or the University of Hawaii. (For more on PACE, see ALL HANDS, January 1967.)

It requires two crews to keep up with a Polaris sub. George C. Marshall presently patrols out of Holy Loch, Scotland. Each cruise is approximately 60 days in duration, with one month between cruises. The off crew, when relieved, is flown back to the U. S. for training, leave and liberty.

George C. Marshall slid down the ways on 21 May 1965, after Mrs. George Marshall had broken a champagne bottle across her bow. The principal speaker that day was Dean Acheson, former Secretary of State.

The nuclear submarine spent the next month alongside the pier at Newport News. She was commissioned on 29 April.

In one respect George C. Marshall is exactly like her sister ships: She has never failed to meet her commitments due to failure of the system, which includes the missile, the submarine, and the crew.


USS George Bancroft SSBN 643 – Pax Per Scientiam

Looking back over the US Navy’s history, there are many moments that define greatness or the aspiration for greatness. John Paul Jones heroic deeds certainly set the tone for what the future Navy would look like. The words “I have not yet begun to fight” will always stand out as the benchmark of bravery in the face of enormous odds.

Skill and courage were always important parts of seagoing men. The lessons passed down through the ages were absolutely critical to success and each generation added their own learning to the collective set of governing principles. The schools were the ships that sailed in the harshest and calmest of seas and the learning was critical to always bringing out best to the battle.

But technology was something that crept into the mix and challenged even the most experienced sailors and officers. Sails would someday give in to steam and steam would advance through a variety of evolutionary and more efficient fuels. Even the tactics that were employed in combatting an enemy would face challenges as the industry of war became more complex and mature.

The need for a more efficient way to train young men into the arts of naval warfare became more and more apparent as time passed. From the Encyclopedia Britannica:

“The academy was founded as a Naval School on Oct. 10, 1845, by George Bancroft, historian, educator, and secretary of the Navy, to improve the then-unsatisfactory methods of instructing midshipmen. At first the course was five years, of which only the first and last were spent at the school, the intervening three years being spent on board ships on active service. The school was reorganized in 1850–51 as the U.S. Naval Academy, with a course of study of four consecutive years. A summer practice cruise replaced the omitted sea service and permitted intensive training.”

As ships began their transformation to the newer technologies, the Academy was one of the first major efforts to advance the technological knowledge and skills of the men who would operate them. For over fifty years, this was one of the only formal sources of advanced training but it led to the vast array of technical schools that now support our modern day Navy.

The submarine featured today is named after a visionary man who set the stage for that future development in learning.

USS George Bancroft SSBN 643

George Bancroft (3 October 1800 – 17 January 1891) was an American historian and statesman who was prominent in promoting secondary education both in his home state and at the national level. During his tenure as U.S. Secretary of the Navy, he established the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1845.

USS George Bancroft (SSBN-643), a Benjamin Franklin class (or �-class”) fleet ballistic missile submarine, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of George Bancroft (1800-1891), United States Secretary of the Navy (1845–1846) and the founder of the United States Naval Academy.

Namesake: George Bancroft (1800–1891), U.S. Secretary of the Navy (1845-1846)

Builder: General Dynamics Electric Boat

Sponsored by: Mrs. Anita Irvine

Commissioned: 22 January 1966

Decommissioned: 21 September 1993

Fate: Scrapping via Ship and Submarine Recycling Program completed 30 March 1998

General characteristics

Class and type: Benjamin Franklin-class submarine

Displacement: 7,300 long tons (7,417 t) surfaced

8,250 long tons (8,382 t) submerged

Installed power: 15,000 shp (11,185 kW)

Propulsion: One S5W pressurized-water nuclear reactor, two geared steam turbines, one shaft

Complement: Two crews (Blue Crew and Gold Crew) of 120 men each

Armament: 16 × ballistic missile tubes

4 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes (all forward)

George Bancroft (SSBN-643) goes ballistic on 24 Apr 1982 as a navy Trident missile is launched from the nuclear-powered strategic missile submarine.

From Admiral Rickover’s book Eminent Americans:

NAMED FOR George Bancroft (1800-91) author, educator, literary critic of note and America’s foremost 19th century historian a man whose keen mind applied itself as fruitfully to problems of politics, administration and diplomacy as to the pursuit of truth in the realm of pure intellect. His preeminence as a scholar was matched by able performance while serving his country as Secretary of the Navy and as minister to London and Berlin.

Navy men know Bancroft best as the founder of the Naval Academy. He was appointed Secretary of the Navy by Polk in 1845, at a time when the crisis with Britain over the Oregon boundary, and with Mexico over admission of Texas to the Union, called for an effective combat-ready Navy. Bancroft found the Navy disorganized, rent by dissension, the politically appointed officers inadequately trained for their duties. With a fresh mind, unbound by naval traditions, he set about the necessary reforms. It was clear to him that the basis of a first rate Navy must be a first-rate officer corps. Since we lacked the reservoir from which the English drew their officers—an educated upper class with a long tradition of public service—he felt we must have an academy where young men from all walks of life received schooling that would shape them into well educated, technically competent officers. But Congress, mis trusting the idea, had twice voted down proposals for a naval officer school. In view of the urgency of the problem, Bancroft decided to act on his own.

As assets he could count the existence of two small schools where, during brief periods ashore, midshipmen were taught mathematics and navigation also of a small number of teachers posted to the larger ships to give instruction at sea. Using the best of the teachers as the nucleus of a permanent faculty, he was able to house them in an abandoned Army post—Fort Severn. Since he had the authority to order midshipmen ashore, he assigned them to the school as ships reached port. By stringent economies, he found enough money to finance the first term he also succeeded in getting an able man (Commander Buchanan) appointed as head. Under him, standards of discipline, deportment and academic performance soon exceeded anything previously seen. Faced with a fait accompli, Congress was won over and appropriated funds for continuance of the Naval Academy.

During his year and a half term as Secretary, Bancroft also took steps that brought the solution of the Texas problem appreciably closer. He gave orders that led to the occupation of California and sent Zachary Taylor into disputed territory between Texas and Mexico. Years later, when serving as minister at Berlin, he was instrumental in bringing the Oregon dispute to a satisfactory conclusion. At his behest, the German Emperor was induced to act as referee. So ably did Bancroft argue our case that the award went to the United States.

He was equally successful in performing the principal task entrusted to him at Berlin—to resolve the long drawn-out conflict between the United States and Prussia over the status of nationalized citizens of German origin. The views of the two countries were diametrically opposed. As a country of immigration, we held it was the right of anyone to change his nationality we therefore granted nationalization to qualified aliens without regard to claims upon them asserted by their countries of origin. Prussia, as most other European countries, maintained that a citizen could not escape his civic duties, especially military service, by emigrating and becoming nationalized abroad. Whether returning for brief visits to relatives or for prolonged re-domicile, German-Americans in large numbers were seized and put into the army. England’s impressment of American sailors-one of the causes of the War of 1812—was justified by her on a similar conception of non-divestible nationality.

Bancroft, who knew his Germans, appealed to Bismarck’s sense of family solidarity, arguing that maintenance of ties between German-Americans and their relatives was desirable from every point of view, and their visits to Germany ought not therefore be rendered hazardous by the threat of military impressment. He succeeded in obtaining acceptance of the principle that an individual has the right to renounce his nationality, Prussia being the first European power to acknowledge this novel American idea. In his turn, Bismarck won his point that such renunciation must be bona fide that Germany could not permit her citizens to visit America briefly, become nationalized and then return and resettle in Germany, thus demonstrating the ease with which one might escape his military duties. Agreement was reached that American nationalization after 5 years of residence would be accepted by Germany as proof of genuine American citizenship, provided the former national did not return to Germany with intent to settle there permanently, a visit of less than 2 years being considered permissible.

The Bancroft formula proved acceptable to most European countries and became the basis of numerous consular and nationalization treaties it was also incorporated into our own laws of nationality, tempering the previous custom of granting citizenship without any requirement that naturalized citizens continue to demonstrate a sincere desire to accept full citizenship responsibilities.

Bancroft’s personal popularity was important in the success of his mission to Berlin. He was one of the first American college graduates to study at a German university and obtain a doctor ate, graduate education then not being available in the United States. He spoke the language, and had translated German books and written informed and sympathetic articles interpreting German literature to America moreover, he was a scholar of world renown and thus enjoyed the respect Germany customarily accorded eminent savants. His success as a scholar made him a more effective diplomat conversely, his diplomatic position enabled him to ransack European archives for primary sources for his historical writings.

Bancroft’s claim to fame rests chiefly on his monumental History of the United States in 10 volumes (later condensed by him to six) which he was 40 years writing. At the University of Giittingen he had observed the meticulous scholarship for which Germany then was world famous. This he applied to his History, achieving an authenticity not found in contemporary American historical writings. In his methods of research, his rigorous effort to base the book on documentable evidence, he was modern. But the fact that he wrote history as literature, and that he conceived of American history as an “epic of freedom and democracy” obsoletes his work in the eyes of many “science-oriented” historians today.


On Self-Government

Brothers of the American Historical Association:

I welcome you to this third anniversary of your existence. You, who, in our universities, instruct the coining generation in the history of their race you, who break from duties in Church or in State, to show your love for your fellow-men by your zeal in the study of their progress you, who for a moment throw aside the cares of the press, the toil of authorship, or the delights of study in retirement, in the name of the Association I bid joy to you all at your renewed presence with one another.

The object of our pursuit is one of the grandest that solicit the attention of man. The movement of states over the scene of ever-succeeding action is like the march of so many armies with their various civilizations for their banners: they themselves have faded away their career, their enduring contributions to the sum of human knowledge, their men of transcendent genius, such as are vouchsafed to the race at great intervals of centuries, all come within the range of our pursuits. Moreover, we are nearest of kin to the students of moral philosophy.

The movements of humanity are governed by law. It is true that the sparrow, when the time comes for its fall to the ground, obeys a law that pervades the Kosmos and it is equally true that every hair in the bead of a human being is numbered. The growth and decay of empire, the morning lustre of a dynasty and its fall from the sky before noonday the first turning of a sod for the foundation of a city to the footsteps of a traveller searching for its place which time has hidden, all proceed as it is ordered. The character of science attaches to our pursuits.

The difficulty of discerning the presence of law in the actions of rational beings grows out of the infinite variety of the movements of the human will and of the motives by which it may be swayed. In the department of history the difficulty of judgment is diminished, for history deals with the past, which is beyond the reach of change. The discerning statesman may forecast the character of coming events, and form a plan of action with a reasonable confidence in its wisdom but the critic, who does not bring with him the spirit of candid inquiry, cannot comprehend the institutions that are forming themselves before his eyes.

In all antiquity no true democracy existed as a government yet our national organization accepted elements from the political organizations of the Greeks it counts Christianity among its sources it profited by the experience of the Roman empire in establishing inter-citizenship and domestic free trade. It was essentially imbued with the spirit of the Reformation, which rose up in Germany with Luther and was developed by Calvin in France and in Switzerland. It drew from England ideas of personal liberty and elements suited to the form of government which it had to frame. In its colonial period it derived from its own experience an opulence of forms of representative government. The American people have cause to be grateful to preceding generations for their large inheritance. Here is no rule of &ldquothe many&rdquo it is the government by the people, the government by all were individuals or a class to set themselves apart, they would constitute only a sect. A government that is less than government by the entire people will by its very nature incline to the benefit of classes. The government of our &ldquonew nation&rdquo is rightly described by one of its greatest exponents as &ldquogovernment of the people, by the people, for the people.&rdquo

The singular combination of the best elements of the past in our institutions favored our increase of territory. Our fathers expressed their vast aspirations in the Articles of Confederation. We never extended our limits in the direction which they pointed out but it was not long before we reached the Gulf of Mexico. When a foothold in the West India Islands was offered to the United States, they, after reflection, refused to plant their foot on the richest of them all, and have never departed from the decision not to enter the tropics. The completeness of the country was not established till a President of the United States succeeded by one treaty with Great Britain and another with Mexico to enter into the peaceful possession of the continent for sixteen degrees on the Pacific. It was this settlement which perfected the Union. From that moment its majesty and safety rested on the line of east and west and as far as the human eye can see we may in consequence hold our Union in perpetuity.

In the first Congress slavery brought danger to the Union under the Presidency of John Adams, it took steps for an early dissolution it was quieted for a while by Jefferson and his immediate successors but from the moment that the country advanced its western boundary to the Pacific, the dissolution of the Union became impossible. The will of the people was able to exact its preservation but what an infinity of power was necessary to carry out that will! To express it I adopt the words of an English writer, who is a master of his own noble language, a thorough scholar, and honored as an historian in both hemispheres. &ldquoThere are certain things,&rdquo he says, &ldquowhich only democracy can execute. No monarchy or privileged order could have dared to take the measures necessary to maintain the American Union. They would infallibly have wrecked themselves in the effort.&rdquo1

We may ask, What is the spirit of the government which has saved its life by its incomparable energy? Because the United States know their Constitution to be for them the ripened fruit of time, they have never been propagandists. Washington, in the letters in which he declares in favor of republican governments for the United States, gives as his reason that no other government is suited to their social and political condition. The United States have never importuned or encouraged others to adopt their principles of government prematurely.

What traits belong specially to government by the people? Montesquieu, the upright magistrate, who, living under despotic rule, nevertheless insisted that by the Constitution of France its king was not absolute, sought in the records of history to discern the tendency of each great form of government, and has left his testimony that &ldquothe spirit of monarchy is war and aggrandizement the spirit of a republic is peace and moderation.&rdquo &ldquoL&rsquoesprit de la monarchie est la guerre et l&rsquoagrandissement: l&rsquoesprit de la république est la paix et la modération.&rdquo2

The necessary conditions of the American Union consisted in an absolute equality, of rights among the States. It was hard for some of the original thirteen to think that territories, far in the interior, should be absolutely equal with the original thirteen, and the centre of power be ultimately transferred to the West, which was then a wilderness but the Voice of wisdom and the counsels of hope prevailed, and when the only irresistible cause of antagonism in our country was removed, there ceased to be any motive for dissension between the North and the South. There never was and never can be a collision between the West and the East, for they both alike wish the highways between the oceans to be free and by universal consent, from the remotest point where Maine touches Canada to the southwestern line of California, from the orange groves of Florida to the strait where the Pacific Ocean drives its deep tide swiftly between its walls of basalt, there is for the inhabitants the one simple rule of universal inter-citizenship and universal free trade under government of the people by the people.

The people of the United States are the most conservative in the world, for they cherish self-government as the most precious of possessions. They make laws deliberately only after long reflection, and they only make laws within the limits of their Constitutions. From end to end of the United States two houses of legislation exist as the rule, and the executive possesses a veto. A Constitution may be changed only after a reference in some form to every individual of the community.

If the question may be asked, Does a king or a people give the most honest support to the institutions which they both have accepted, we must turn to France for a reply. Once in a reconstruction of its government a Bourbon was enthroned in France as a constitutional king the first successor to the throne conspired against that settlement and was driven into exile, all the world pronouncing the judgment that he justly fell. Next came the house of Orleans, holding up the flag of a monarchy that should be the best of republics. Its king, in many things a wise and faithful man, made the interest of his family paramount to the interest of the nation, and in legislation obstinately refused to extend the suffrage so as to conform it to the principle on which he had received the crown. And he, too, having been false to the principle on which he accepted power, provoked an insurrection, and in the judgment of mankind justly fell. A member of another dynasty, being called to the presidency of the French republic, reached at the imperial crown, and carried France into an unequal and wilful war with its neighbor, bringing utter defeat on himself and the heaviest sorrows and losses on the generous land which he had ruled.

The form of government of &ldquothe new nation&rdquo seems to the world to be but of yesterday and it is so yet this government by the people, for the people is the oldest one now existing in the civilized world this side of the empire of the Czars. Since the inauguration of Washington, Portugal and Spain have passed from irresponsible monarchy to constitutional rule. The republic of Holland has disappeared. In France government by the people exists by the deliberate choice of the nation. Germany, which in the middle of the last century was divided into hundreds of sovereignties, has formed itself into one consolidated government with a parliament elected by universal suffrage. The republic of Kosciuszko has utterly perished. Switzerland has thrown aside its mediæval form of confederacy, and is now a true government by the people. It would be hard to count the revolutions which the Grand Duchy of Austria has undergone within the last ninety-six years. Italy, thank God, is become one. The United Kingdom, too, is revolutionized. The case of England is simply this: its king and its church long time ago broke from the Roman see many of the people accepted the Reformation Englishmen, including dissenters, were driven through a series of conflicts to the attempt to found the government of the people by the people the attempt was premature and failed. The court again conspired against the rights of Englishmen. The people, especially the dissenters, kept themselves in the background, and in 1688 intrusted the conduct of a new British revolution to the aristocracy. The price taken by the aristocracy for success was their own all but absolute rule of Great Britain. The House of Commons became master of the king and that master of the king was elected chiefly on the dictation of the majority of the land-owners. The system was secured by bringing in a new dynasty, which had only a parliamentary title to the Crown. This was the revolution of 1688.

The aristocracy of England seemed to have founded their power upon an everlasting rock but the great expansion of industry and commerce, and the consequent immense accumulation of wealth, soon compelled them to make a place by their side for the moneyed interest. Commerce and industry went on in due time the example of the United States had its influence in the world France excited rivalry by once more entering upon the career of a free state at last the reform of the British House of Commons began next the corn laws were repealed then science by its successful inventions almost annihilated the cost of transportation of articles, wheat among the rest, from continent to continent, so that land in England lost its high value the basis on which the rule of the British land-holders rested began to totter and now, in the fulness of time, the House of Commons, which is the ruler of the United Kingdom, has taken itself out of the hands of the land-owners and placed itself in the keeping of the British and Irish people. &ldquoThe people,&rdquo says a late English writer,3 &ldquoare now sovereign, and officials of all ranks will obey their master&rsquos.&rdquo

The United States of to-day are the chief home of the English-speaking population of the world for in all their extent English is the language of a people of sixty millions. Canada stretches along their border a straight line from England to Australia would cross their domain Newfoundland, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia flank them on the east the Bermudas and the Bahamas are anchored near their doors a general representation of all who speak the English tongue would find in the United States the central place most convenient for meeting.

George Bancroft (October 3, 1800&ndashJanuary 17, 1891) was a historian and statesman, known for promoting secondary education on the state and federal levels. While he was US Secretary of the Navy, he established the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis.


Bancroft Sail Exhibit

Other U.S. military bases may have ceremonial tanks or aircraft at their front gates, but Kings Bay has a submarine greeting visitors at the entrance to the 16,000-acre naval base located in Coastal Georgia. Rising from a sea of green grass at the Franklin Gate is the USS George Bancroft Sail Exhibit, a display commemorating the Navy’s submarine program.

USS George Bancroft (SSBN 643), commissioned Jan. 22, 1966, in Groton, Connecticut, served in the Navy’s submarine service for more than 27 years. With the advent of the Ohio-class submarines and the end of the Cold War, the older Franklin-class submarines were no longer needed and Bancroft was decommissioned and struck from the Navy list Sept. 21, 1993.

Bancroft ended up in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Washington for scrapping and recycling in March 1998. However, Bancroft would not go away easily.

Alerted to its imminent destruction, a grassroots effort by the St. Marys Submarine Museum, a local submarine veteran’s organization, former Bancroft crew members and local businesses raised the necessary funding to bring the submarine’s sail to Kings Bay and to construct the exhibit.

Saved from the recycling bin in 1998, the sail display was constructed and built as the centerpiece for Kings Bay’s celebration of the submarine forces’ 100th anniversary April 7, 2000.

Between October 1999 and March 2000, members of Construction Battalion Unit 412 cleared and grubbed 500 tons of soil and trees to construct the footings, foundation and lighting necessary for the exhibit. The Seabees molded the earth to resemble a submarine hull, allowing a contractor to then spray the earthen hull with a thick coat of black gunite.

The exhibit is located directly in front of the Franklin entrance to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at the intersection of St. Marys Road and Georgia State Highway Spur 40. The exhibit is free and open to the public.


Service history [ edit | edit source ]

George Bancroft was assigned to Submarine Squadron 14 of Submarine Flotilla 6 with New London, Connecticut, as her home port. Her first deployment began with her departure from New London on her first deterrent patrol on 26 July 1966, manned by the Blue Crew. Soon after she successfully completed the patrol with her arrival at Holy Loch, Scotland, the Gold Crew relieved the Blue Crew. A few weeks later, George Bancroft got underway for her second deterrent patrol, manned by the Gold Crew, which ended toward the close of the year. Early in 1967, George Bancroft began her third deterrent patrol, manned by the Blue Crew.

History needed for 1967-1993.


Service history [ edit ]

George Bancroft was assigned to Submarine Squadron 14 of Submarine Flotilla 6 with New London, Connecticut, as her home port. Her first deployment began with her departure from New London on her first deterrent patrol on 26 July 1966, manned by the Blue Crew. Soon after she successfully completed the patrol with her arrival at Holy Loch, Scotland, the Gold Crew relieved the Blue Crew. A few weeks later, George Bancroft got underway for her second deterrent patrol, manned by the Gold Crew, which ended toward the close of the year. Early in 1967, George Bancroft began her third deterrent patrol, manned by the Blue Crew.

History needed for 1967-1993.


Watch the video: USS George Bancroft - My Corner of the World (August 2022).